ANNOUNCEMENTS
  • Spring Break from April 8th-12th.
  • HSSC Baseball Game @Samsung Lions Park on April 4th.
  • [HS] Friendly Match Soccer vs. DMHS @Camp Walker on April 2nd.
  • Don't forget your spirit shirts on Friday.
The Student News Site of Daegu International School

Jets Flyover

Daegu International School's student news site
ANNOUNCEMENTS
  • Spring Break from April 8th-12th.
  • HSSC Baseball Game @Samsung Lions Park on April 4th.
  • [HS] Friendly Match Soccer vs. DMHS @Camp Walker on April 2nd.
  • Don't forget your spirit shirts on Friday.
The Student News Site of Daegu International School

Jets Flyover

The Student News Site of Daegu International School

Jets Flyover

Solo Sanctuary or Social Suite

Perspectives on the Roommate Dilemma
Illustration by Elisa Triolo.

It would be nice to have a roommate. They could be your best friends and it would just be nice to have someone you know in school. They can also motivate me to do school work instead of scrolling through tik tok.”

— Flora Yoon

As someone who lived in the dorm for 3 years, I think it’s going to be awful. It would be hard for me to adjust to the new conditions and furthermore, because our dorm rooms include bathrooms I wouldn’t want to share the same bathroom with a roommate.” 

— Elba Jekal

Consider this: School bummed you out today. You drag your feet to an empty dark dorm room, but instead, someone welcomes you with a sympathetic smile. How would you like that? A roommate definitely brings security and companionship to otherwise mundane nights on campus. On the other hand, you might not get along well and live in constant conflict. So which option would you choose?

International schools like ours, such as KIS Jeju, offer dormitories with rooms capable of holding more than one person, but DIS only offers singles to students. Various types of dorms exist – some even provide triples. How does this living condition affect students? Let us answer this question by diving into the roommate dilemma.

Opinions vary drastically when it comes to lifestyle. DIS dorm students have varying opinions as well. 7th grader Elba Jekal says, “As someone who lived in the dorm for 3 years, I think it’s going to be awful. It would be hard for me to adjust to the new conditions and furthermore, because our dorm rooms include bathrooms I wouldn’t want to share the same bathroom with a roommate.”

Contrary to this, Flora Yoon in 9th grade said, “It would be nice to have a roommate. They could be your best friends and it would just be nice to have someone you know in school. They can also motivate me to do school work instead of scrolling through tik tok.” She claimed that a roomie would benefit her school life and comfort her in a new environment apart from family.

Hans Park in 8th grade remained neutral. “There would be positive sides but there would also be negative sides,” he said. “It would be interesting although it would take away privacy. So far, it would depend on the person. If I were to have a roommate I just hope the dorms give us a survey to see what type of people we’d like to live with.”

Teachers also have a say. DIS science teacher Ms. Lualhati said, “I would say I would not like it to happen. As a teacher, I always want to have a me-time. If I have somebody with me I won’t feel like I’m resting and my degree of comfort will also be affected. But I guess if students have roommates I think that will be fine. There is a huge difference between students and teachers. Having a roommate would be okay so students can feel like there would be someone to help them out. ”

In my opinion, diverse life experiences, regardless of the outcome, provide a rich opportunity for growth and change. You learn social skills, respect, and responsibility. If you bicker with your bunkmate, simply request a room change. No big deal.

A partner also helps you develop social connections, an incredible benefit. A year spent with one close companion results in a ripple effect of a wider social network and the ability to escape your comfort zone. This flexibility, required with your future endeavors in life, such as work, relationships, and family, will certainly guide you through the rest of your glory days.

Some individuals, however, need privacy and space. What’s most important is that you feel safe and comfortable in your own home. So what do you think? Roommate in the dorms – yes or no?

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About the Contributor
Jules Youn, Writer
7th grader Jules Youn decided to challenge herself and join the Jets Flyover team. She spreads  joy when she shares tidbits about her passions. As a creative risk taker, Jules entertains the DIS student body as a lead performer in the Drama Club. She endeavors to craft a diverse spectrum of literary genres and deliver her enthusiasm to the DIS community.
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